Aug 25, 2019  
ARCHIVED 2018-19 CPS Undergraduate Catalog 
    
ARCHIVED 2018-19 CPS Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Academic Policies and Procedures



Enrollment Procedures

Schedule of Terms

Terms vary slightly each year. Most courses are offered in an eight-week intensive format. During the eight-week term, students attend one class session per week for each course in which they are enrolled. Both morning and evening classes are offered.

Census day is the last day to drop each term without financial or grade implications.

Registration

The schedule of classes is released at least five weeks prior to the beginning of the next term. Registration will begin at least two weeks before the term starts. Census day is the last day to drop a course each term and is noted on the academic calendar. Students are encouraged to meet with their academic adviser once the schedule is released in order to know what classes they need before registration begins.

Registration is done by the student on-line through WebAdvisor. Once a student has met with their advisor, they can register for classes, view their course schedule, and agree to pay their tuition and fees.

Cross Enrollment

In rare instances, a student is permitted to cross-enroll between the College of Professional Studies and the College of Arts and Sciences. Permission is required from the Vice President for Academic Affairs and the College of Professional Studies Dean. A cross-enrolled student must pay all costs, including tuition, associated with enrollment at the campus other than his/her main campus.

Transfer Policy Between the College of Professional Studies and the College of Arts and Sciences

A student who attends the College of Professional Studies or the College of Arts and Sciences may be admitted to the other program after an absence from the University of two full academic years. A student who wishes to attend the other program after a shorter period of time must have the written permission of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The student must meet the criteria for admission and must be formally admitted by the other program. The student must also be in good standing with the Business Office.

Repeating a Course

Courses in which a grade of F, D-, D, or D+ has been received may be repeated and generally, such courses may be repeated only once.

The cumulative grade point average and the grade point average in the major are computed using only the credits and grade earned in the repeated course. Course credits can be counted only once toward the required hours for graduation.

A student may enroll at another college in a course that is a repeat of a course taken at Doane in which the grade earned was below a C-. The course must be taken for a grade and the grade earned must be at least a C-. The grade in the successfully repeated course is recorded on the Doane transcript as a "P" (Pass). The cumulative grade point average is then computed without the original grade in the calculation.

Pass/Fail Option

A student who has accumulated at least 60 semester credits on the Doane University transcript may choose to enroll in one course per term using the Pass/Fail Option. This option allows an instructor to assign either a "P" (Pass) or "F" (Fail) grade in the course, instead of a letter grade. The following stipulations apply

  1. Only one course per term may be taken on a pass/fail basis. (This does not include courses normally graded on a pass/fail basis.)
  2. A student must not enroll in an internship for four credits or more in the same term he/she has declared a Pass/Fail Option course.
  3. A maximum of two Doane Core Connection courses may be taken using the Pass/Fail Option. A student who transfers in two or more courses for the Doane Core Connections is not eligible to use the Pass/Fail Option for any additional Doane Core Connection courses.
  4. A Pass/Fail Option course may be taken in, but not counted toward, the student's major. Exception: a Doane Core Connection course which is taken using the Pass/Fail Option may count toward the major if the course was taken before the major was declared.
  5. The grade of "P" (pass) will have no effect on the student's cumulative grade point average. (In order to receive a grade of "P" (pass), a student must earn a grade of "C-" or above in the course.)
  6. The grade of "F" (fail) will be figured in the student's cumulative grade point average.

Full, Quarter, and Half-time Status

A full-time student in the College of Professional Studies is a student in six credits or more per term. A quarter time is a student enrolled in 5 credits.  A half-time student is enrolled in 3-4 credits. A student enrolled in less than three credits per term is less than half time.

Double Majors and Emphases

A student who chooses to complete more than one major or emphasis may fulfill the requirements by using common courses, unless otherwise specified.

Instructional Methods

Doane University offers courses in several different instructional methods to serve the non-traditional learner.  Online courses are defined as a course where 75% or more of the instruction is done using technology; in an eight week term, six or more weeks are outside of a classroom.  Hybrid or blended courses are courses where 50-74% of the course is instructed using technology; in an eight week term the course meets 3 to 4 times in a classroom.  Ground courses are in a classroom for all eight class meetings in the term.

Class Attendance

A student is expected to regularly attend all classes for which he/she is registered. Absence from class jeopardizes a student's understanding of the course and may result in a reduction of grade. The extent of such reduction is to be determined by the individual instructor. Each student is responsible for all work missed, regardless of the reason for the absence. There is no such thing as an automatic excuse from any segment of academic endeavor, nor is there an automatic extension of due date for assigned work. If possible, a student is expected to contact instructors before an absence occurs to receive the next assignment or make-up assignment.

New Coursework at Other Institutions

A student may take courses at other institutions while enrolled at Doane University. However, if the student wishes to transfer the courses to Doane, the courses must be approved in advance by the College of Professional Studies Dean. The courses are to be taken for a grade (not pass/fail), and a grade of "C-" or better has to be earned to be considered for transfer. A student planning to earn credit by correspondence must have the course approved in advance by the College of Professional Studies Dean.

Supplemental Course Offerings

In addition to regular catalog courses offered in a particular term, the following options are also available:

Selected Topics courses (271, 371, 471) offer students an opportunity to investigate topics not covered in any other course and provide a procedure for faculty to pilot new courses. A selected topics course is not offered as an independent study but as a supplement to regular catalog courses and is listed on the schedule of classes. Selected topics courses may be offered for 1-3 credits. Generally, a maximum of six credits of selected topics courses may be counted in the student's major. Selected topics are repeatable for credit, provided the topic is different. Once a particular selected topics course has been offered during two consecutive years, it must be approved by the faculty as a regular catalog course before it can be offered again.

Directed Studies (290, 390, 490) offer an opportunity for supervised, independent study of a particular topic based on the interest of the student and the availability and approval of the faculty. Directed Studies may be offered for 1-3 credits. Directed Studies are repeatable for credit, provided the topic is different.


Grades and Credits

Grading System

Letter grades are used to evaluate a student's performance in class work. These letter grades become part of the student's permanent record. The grade of A is reserved for superior performance in all course requirements. The grade of B is awarded for work of high quality. The grade of C recognizes satisfactory achievement in meeting course expectations. The grade of D designates unsatisfactory performance in meeting course requirements. The grade of F represents failure to meet course requirements. Other grades include I - Incomplete; P - Passed; AU - Audit; IP - In Progress (Passing); and W - Withdraw.

An Incomplete (I) may be given if a student is not able to complete the work required for a course by the last day of the course due to sickness or other extenuating circumstance that the student has discussed with the instructor. When awarding an incomplete, the instructor will assign an expiration date no later than the last day of the next term. If the expiration date passes without a grade change from the instructor, the incomplete grade will automatically convert to an "F". This is a final grade and will not be changed, per the grade change policy.

In order to receive an incomplete (I), a student must have completed at least 75% of the coursework required for the course. If a student wishes to receive an incomplete for a course, the student will obtain a form from the registrar that will allow the teacher and the student to detail the coursework required to remove the incomplete. The student must complete the form, obtain the signature of the instructor on the form, and return the form to the registrar's office.

For courses such as practicums, senior seminars, or internships intended to last longer than a single term, instructors will submit a grade of "In Progress" (IP) at the end of the first term.

The "P" grade is used for courses offered only on a Pass/Fail basis, courses completed using the Pass/Fail Option, credit for courses transferred from other colleges, and credit earned through portfolio evaluation or the Credit by Examination process.

The "In Progress" (IP) grade is used only in courses that extend beyond the normal ending date of a term and indicates that the student is currently passing the course. This grade must be replaced with an appropriate letter grade assigned by the instructor.

Grade point averages are computed by dividing the total grade points earned by the number of GPA credits. AU, I, W, P and IP grades are not included in the calculation.

Grade Point System

Grade points are assigned to the respective grades as follows:

Grade Grade Points Per Credit Grade Grade Points Per Credit Grade Grade Points Per Credit
A+ 4.0 B- 2.7 D 1.0
A 4.0 C+ 2.3 D- 0.7
A- 3.7 C 2.0 F 0.0
B+ 3.3 C- 1.7    
B 3.0 D+ 1.3    

Class Standing

Students are classified according to the number of credits they have earned. Students must successfully complete the minimum credits detailed below:

Sophomore - 30 credits
Junior - 60 credits
Senior - 90 credits

Credit Hours

Doane University follows the federal guideline defining a credit hour as one hour (50 minutes) of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks (one semester), or the equivalent amount of work over a different time period (e.g., an 8-week term). This definition applies to courses regardless of delivery format, and thus includes in-person, online, and hybrid courses (combination of in-person and online).  It also applies to internship, laboratory, performance, practicum, research, student teaching, and studio courses, among other contexts.  

To ensure that courses and activities satisfy the time commitment (or equivalent) defined above and pursue the learning outcomes described for each course/activity, proposed curriculum changes are reviewed by the Academic Affairs Committee (which is comprised of appropriate representatives from across the university).  If approved by the committee, the changes are then forwarded to the full faculty for its approval or disapproval.  Approved changes are then included in the university course catalog the following academic year.

Grade Reports

A student's grade in each course is filed with the Registrar and is recorded on the transcript. At the end of each term, the final grades are issued to students over the web via WebAdvisor.


Grade Appeal Policy

A common academic issue sought by a student is the appeal of a course grade.  A faculty member determines the character of a course which includes content, instructional practices, and assessment procedures.  Instructors have the right to assign a course grade based on any method that is professionally acceptable, shared with all students, and applied equally. Each student has the right to a course grade based upon an unbiased evaluation of his/her performance and the specified grading procedure.  A student has the right to ask for clarification of the basis for his/her grade.

Valid reasons for initiating the grade appeal process include, but are not limited to,

  • a failure to follow published course, program, or University policies,
  • a lack of consistency within the student's course section, or
  • the grade awarded was motivated by ill will.

Students who believe that their grade was miscalculated due to a mathematical error should contact the instructor within ten (10) days of the grade posting.  

The following are NOT valid reasons for initiating the grade appeal process: (i) a disagreement with the application of course policies and/or grading standards, (ii) the requirements or examination standards of an academic program, (iii) concerns over professionally acceptable teaching approaches, (iv) differing personalities, and (v) differences in classroom policies or grading schemes in different courses or between different sections of the same course.  

The grade appeal process must be initiated no later than ten (10) days from the posting of the final course grade.  A student is encouraged to talk with their advisor to offer an assessment of the concern and to clarify the steps of the grievance process.

Appeal Steps

STEP 1:  A student is encouraged to pursue a good-faith attempt at informally resolving his or her concern about the course grade.  The student will communicate with the involved faculty member to seek a resolution. If needed, the student can contact the Office of Academic Affairs (Crete-campus) or the Campus director (Lincoln, Grand Island, Omaha campus locations) for assistance in contacting a faculty member.  A student may be requested to put their appeal in writing. Within five (5) working days from the time the student raises the concern, the involved faculty member will evaluate the concern, render a decision, and notify the student. As part of his/her evaluation, the faculty member may schedule a follow-up conversation with the student and may consult University faculty, staff, or administrators for clarification and/or guidance.  If the involved faculty member does not act on or resolve the concern to the reasonable satisfaction of the student, the student can initiate STEP 2 of the appeal process.  

STEP 2:  Within five (5) working days of the student being notified by the involved faculty member of his/her decision, the student writes an appeal letter specifying

  • the course number and section,
  • the term/year in which the course was taught,
  • the name of instructor for the course,
  • a statement of facts as the student perceives them, citing specific instances where, in the student's opinion, policies and procedures were violated or were unfairly applied,
  • a summary of the outcome from STEP 1,
  • the remedy sought by the student,
  • a copy of the course syllabus, and
  • the best method to communicate with the student (phone, e-mail, etc.).

The student submits their appeal letter to the Registrar's Office.  The Registrar will provide the appeal to the supervisor of the faculty member for the course.  Within ten (10) working days from receipt of the letter, the supervisor will evaluate the concern, render a decision, and notify the student.  As part of his/her evaluation, the supervisor may schedule a conversation with the student and may consult University faculty, staff, or administrators for clarification and/or guidance.  If the supervisor does not act on or resolve the concern to the reasonable satisfaction of the student, within ten (10) days of being notified of the decision, the student can initiate STEP 3 of the appeal process.  

STEP 3:  The student can appeal to the appropriate Dean.  The Registrar's Office can offer clarification on the appropriate Dean for the course.  If the Dean was the supervisor in STEP 2, the student can initiate STEP 4. Within ten (10) working days of receipt of the letter, the Dean will evaluate the concern, render a decision, and notify the student.  As part of his/her evaluation, the Dean may schedule a conversation with the student and may consult University faculty, staff, or administrators for clarification and/or guidance. If the Academic Dean does not act on or resolve the concern to reasonable satisfaction of the student, within ten (10) days of being notified of the decision, the student can initiate STEP 4 of the appeal process.  

STEP 4:  The student can submit a written appeal to the Office of Academic Affairs.  In an appeal, the student provides their prior appeal letter and addresses one or both of the following issues for appeal:

  • new evidence that was not reviewed in prior steps and/or
  • any evidence that the review process was improper or unfair.

An appeal letter that does not clearly identify one or both of the issues listed above shall be dismissed without further consideration. The Vice President for Academic Affairs will make an initial assessment of a valid appeal after reviewing the incident file provided by the Registrar's Office and, if necessary, by communicating with relevant parties such as staff or administrators. For a valid appeal request, the Office of Academic Affairs will convene an Appeal Committee consisting of

  • Vice President for Academic Affairs (or designee), will serve as Chair,
  • Associate Vice President for Adult and Online Operations (if the course is an online course),
  • Dean (or administrative designee) for each of the colleges,
  • Registrar, and
  • two full-time faculty members appointed by the Faculty Council who teach outside of the department of the student, have had minimal academic interaction with the student, and who have been at the Doane University at least one year.

The Registrar and the Dean from STEP 3 can participate in the discussions but will be a non-voting members in determining a course of action.  As part of the evaluation, the committee may schedule a conversation with the student and may consult other University faculty, staff, or administrators for guidance and/or clarification.  A majority decision by the Appeal Committee is final and ends the appeal process for a grade appeal.  The majority decision of the Appeal Committee will be shared with the Registrar's Office, who will communicate it to the student.

Grade Changes

After final grade reports are released at the end of a term, the student has up to 10 days to report a computational error to the faculty member.  After 10 days have elapsed, the grade report will be considered correct and complete.  An instructor is not permitted to reconsider the matter, to re-examine the student, or to accept additional work from the student after the grades are submitted.

Audit

A student wishing to attend classes regularly without the responsibility of completing assignments and without receiving credit may do so with the approval of the College of Professional Studies Dean and the instructor. One half the regular tuition rate is charged for an audited course. This needs to be indicated at registration. A grade of AU will appear on the transcript.

Senior Grades

Final grades for seniors who are completing graduation requirements in December or May are processed before Commencement. Once processed, these grades are considered correct and complete.

Grades Upon Withdrawal from a Course

If a student withdraws from a course prior to census day, the course will not appear on the student's transcript. If the student withdraws after census day and prior to the fourth class meeting/week, the transcript will indicate "W" (withdrawal) for that course. If the student withdraws after the fourth class meeting/week, the transcript will indicate "F" (failed) for that course.

Students are subject to administrative withdrawal from the university if they miss all courses for two consecutive academic weeks without an officially valid excuse.

Medical/Compassionate Withdrawal from Doane

A medical withdrawal is granted in rare instances where a student is faced with a serious and unexpected condition that completely precludes him/her from being able to function as a student and in which the regular university withdrawal process is not appropriate. A compassionate withdrawal may be granted when a student is faced with extenuating personal circumstances.

Extenuating circumstances include an accident, illness, injury or incident that could not have been influenced, predicted, planned for or prevented by the student or the institution and death or serious illness of an immediate family member.

The following are not considered extenuating circumstances:

  • Medical condition or chronic illness known to the student at the time of enrollment (unless unforeseen symptoms or relapse occurs; this will be determined on a case-by-case basis).
  • Initially enrolling in a course while knowingly employed full-time, or attempting to work one or more part-time jobs. This includes changes in work schedules that conflict with class schedules.
  • Changing of major or transferring to another institution.
  • Inability (for any reason) to pay your tuition bill or delays in financial aid notification.  

To request a medical/compassionate withdrawal, complete the Late Drop/Withdraw Request Form which is available on the Doane website or through your advisor.  The form must be completed in full and must be accompanied by both a personal written statement and the supporting documentation.  The committee meets every Wednesday. 

Military Transfer/Activation Policy

In the event a student is called to active, state, or federal military duty during the term in which he or she is currently enrolled at Doane, the following options are available to the student:

  • Request complete withdrawal from courses in which enrolled. Tuition and fees will be refunded accordingly based on the time in class and the VA Educational Entitlement program (chapter) being used by the student.
  • Remain enrolled in courses in order to complete coursework off campus by the end of the term. Students must discuss with and receive approval from all instructors to ensure this is possible.
  • Remain enrolled in courses and work with faculty to be assigned Incomplete grades that will be completed within one year from the end of the term. At least 75% of coursework must be completed in order to be eligible for an Incomplete grade. Students must discuss with and receive approval from all instructors for this option.

The student should provide a copy of her or his activation orders or letter from the commander outlining the required military duty to the Registrar's Office.

Students who withdraw from Doane University to serve in any branch of the United States Armed Forces will be readmitted under the same standing as when they withdrew from Doane.

Academic Forgiveness

The Academic Forgiveness Policy is designed for the student who experienced poor, often disastrous, academic results while previously attending Doane University and who can now demonstrate they are prepared to be academically successful in their college experience. A person is eligible to apply for academic forgiveness when at least five (5) years have elapsed since the concluding date of the candidate's last term of enrollment at Doane University and the start date in the College of Professional Studies. The candidate must

  1. re-enter Doane University and successfully complete 12 credits with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5,
  2. have an academic major declared, and
  3. work in conjunction with your Academic Advisor to notify the Registrar's Office in writing of the desire to pursue Academic Forgiveness.

Academic Forgiveness is applied to one semester (College of Arts and Sciences) or two terms (College of Professional Studies) of Doane courses. No letter grades will be removed from the academic record. The period accepted for academic forgiveness will bear the notation "Academic Forgiveness Granted." These courses will then no longer be considered in the grade point average computation. Any academic probations, suspension or dismissals from forgiven term will not be forgiven. Any course for which academic forgiveness is given cannot be used to fulfill graduation requirements. A student who has been granted academic forgiveness must earn a minimum of 30 credit hours from the point of readmission to be eligible to graduate. Academic forgiveness may be granted only one time and is not revocable. Academic forgiveness only pertains to the student's academic record and does not apply to other areas such as financial aid.

Academic Probation and Suspension

A student not maintaining a minimum grade point average based on credits attempted is subject to academic probation or suspension at the end of any term according to the following formula. (Transfer credits are included in the number of credits attempted.) 

Credits Attempted Minimum Academic Avg
6-35 Below 1.70
36-59 Below 1.85
60 or over Below 2.00

The Vice President for Academic Affairs may place a student on academic probation or suspend a student who is not making satisfactory progress and is in danger of failing to meet any all-college requirement, including the grade point average in the major. Specific conditions of probation or suspension are communicated in writing to students by the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

A student placed on academic probation has twelve credits to improve their GPA and return to good standing.  After the 12 credits, if the student's GPA is still below the required minimum academic average for the credits they have attempted, they will be reviewed for suspension.  Any student who is suspended will not be readmitted to Doane University for at least two regular terms and must undertake an activity that illustrates a renewed commitment to learning before applying to the Vice President for Academic Affairs for readmission.

Students may also be suspended or expelled based on the policies outlined in the Student Handbook which includes the Student Conduct Code.


Academic Integrity Policy

SECTION I:  Expectations of the University

Fundamental to our mission, our core values, and our reputation, Doane University adheres to high academic standards. Students of Doane University are expected to conduct themselves in a manner reflecting personal and professional integrity. Disciplinary actions may be taken against students whose academic behavior is not congruent with the expectations of the University. Students are responsible for adhering to the standards detailed in this policy. Not being familiar with these standards does not mean that the students will not be accountable for adherence to them.

 

SECTION II:  Scope, Limitations, and Applicability

This policy is for academic integrity violations occurring in or because of academic coursework and activities associated with taking and completing courses at Doane University. The Doane University Student Handbook discusses policies and processes for non-academic offenses.

 

SECTION III:  Violations of Academic Integrity

In general, Doane University expects that a student will:

  • pursue their academic endeavors with honesty,
  • acknowledge and adhere to the expectations and guidelines in the syllabus,
  • follow instructions for assessments as specified by the faculty member, and
  • ask faculty for clarification if there are any questions.

An academic integrity violation includes, but is not limited to:

  1. Falsification or Fabrication: Making any oral or written statement, which the individual knows, or should have known, to be untrue. Falsification is the alteration of information, while fabrication is the invention or counterfeiting of information. Examples include, but are not limited to:
  • Making a false statement to faculty, University employees, or fellow students.
  • Submitting contrived or altered information in any academic exercise. Example: making up data for an experiment, citing nonexistent articles, contriving reference sources.
  • Giving a false excuse for missing an examination, quiz, or assignment deadline.
  • Falsely claiming to have submitted a paper or assignment.
  1. Cheating: Using or attempting to use unauthorized assistance, material, device, or a study aid in an examination or other academic work, or preventing, or attempting to prevent, another from using authorized assistance, material, or study aids. Examples include, but are not limited to:
  • Using an unauthorized aid, material, electronic resource (e.g., website), or electronic device (e.g., cell phone or tablet) for an examination, quiz, or assignment.
  • Copying from another student's work.
  • Copying another student's answers during individual quizzes or examinations.
  • Altering a graded exam and resubmitting it for a better grade without instructor authorization..
  • Buying, selling, possessing, soliciting, transmitting, or using material purported to be the unreleased content of any assignment, including examinations and quizzes.
  • Bribing or soliciting any person to obtain or to provide any information relating to examinations, quizzes, or other assignments outside of the bounds of the instructions for the assessment.
  • Acting as a substitute for another person during an examination or other assessment.
  1. Collusion and/or Complicity: Collaborating with one or more individuals without instructor approval, on any examination, quiz, computer or laboratory work, or any other assignment or assessment. Collusion includes exchanging or facilitating the exchange of materials or ideas verbally or non-verbally. Complicity includes helping or attempting to help another student to commit an act of academic dishonesty.
  1. Plagiarism: Using the ideas, data, presentation, or language of another without specific or proper acknowledgment in academic work. Examples include but are not limited to:
  • Quoting word-for-word from a source without using quotation marks and appropriate citation.
  • Summarizing and paraphrasing ideas without acknowledging the source.
  • Submitting a paper that was not authored by the student taking the course (e.g., written by another person, paper obtained from a commercial source). 
  • Failing to verbally acknowledge one or more sources during an oral presentation.
  1. Multiple Submissions:  Submitting, without prior permission, academic work that has been previously submitted in identical or similar form to fulfill another academic requirement without instructor authorization. Examples include, but are not limited to, submitting the same paper for credit in two different courses.

 

SECTION IV:  Reporting of Violations

Faculty are expected to follow the process for reporting academic integrity violations in order to maintain the expectations of the University. The philosophy for faculty to report all violations allows the University to maintain a record and documentation of all incidents in a student's file. A faculty member may be unaware that a student has had a prior violation and that a new violation would require additional reviews and/or consequences. Students and faculty are prohibited from proposing and/or entering into an arrangement with an instructor to receive a grade of "F" or any other reduction in grade in a course or on an academic exercise in lieu of being charged with a violation of the academic integrity policy.  Additionally, a student is not permitted to drop the course as a means to avoid being charged with a violation.  Students are encouraged to report suspected or known violations of academic integrity to appropriate faculty, staff, or administrators.

 

SECTION V:  Consequences for an Academic Integrity Violation

Possible consequences for an academic integrity violation include but are not limited to:

Course-Level Consequences (one or more to be specified by the faculty member of the course):

  • Warning on academic integrity and what constitutes a violation
  • Requiring the student to redo the assignment or examination
  • Lowering the student's grade for the assignment or examination
  • Assigning a zero or failing grade for the assignment or examination
  • Lowering the student's grade for the course
  • Assigning the student a failing grade for the course
  • Referral to academic support office for assistance with academic needs
  • Referral to Academic Integrity Subcommittee for additional review

 

University-Level Consequences (to be specified by the Academic Integrity Committee or the Appeal Committee):

  • Suspension from a program or the University
  • Dismissal from a program or the University

 

SECTION VI:  Academic Integrity Process

NOTE: The specified timeline for actions and decisions can potentially be lengthened due to circumstances (e.g. school breaks, unavailability of individuals), though those involved should seek to resolve the issue in a timely manner, and communicate and agree upon any changes to the timeline as soon as possible.

 

STEP 1: Identification of Violation.

The faculty member identifies an alleged academic integrity violation.

 

STEP 2:  Reporting a Violation.

  1. The faculty member contacts the student in a timely manner regarding the alleged violation to request a discussion with the student (in person or via technology).  For purposes of this process, the day when the faculty member contacts the student is considered Day One.  The discussion between the student and faculty should take place within five (5) business days of the faculty member identifying an alleged violation.
  2. The student has two (2) business days to provide the faculty member with his or her own written summary detailing the incident, to provide any relevant documentation or evidence, and to describe any related circumstances.  The student can submit this material using the following online form: http://bit.ly/DU-integrity-student.  If the student chooses to not have a discussion with the faculty member and/or does not provide a written explanation, the faculty member should move forward with the process and note that the student did not participate.
  3. The faculty member has up to three (3) business days to render a decision:
  • A violation did not occur.  The process ends and no details are recorded or submitted.
  • A violation did occur.  The faculty member is encouraged to consult with his or her supervisor for the course (e.g., Department Chair, Division Chair, Program Director, or Dean) to discuss the violation and proposed Course Level consequence(s). The faculty member must specify a consequence(s) and submit all relevant documentation and actions to the Registrar's Office using an online form:  http://bit.ly/DU-integrity.  As part of the submission form, a faculty member can indicate if the issue is egregious and should be forwarded to the Academic Integrity Subcommittee for additional review.  The Registrar's office will forward a copy of the completed Academic Integrity submission to the respective Dean of the course. 
  1. The faculty member has one (1) business day to notify the student of his or her decision and the Course Level consequence(s), if applicable.

 

STEP 3: Documentation

  1. If the student disagrees with the faculty member's decision, within two (2) business days of being notified by the faculty member, the student must submit a disagreement letter to the Academic Integrity Subcommittee outlining his or her disagreement with the alleged violation and/or disagreement with the consequence(s). The student must provide the letter to the Registrar's office (registraroffice@doane.edu) and address it to the Academic Integrity Subcommittee.  The disagreement letter must include discussion of any evidence or additional circumstances.
  2. The Registrar's Office will review the Academic Integrity Violation submission. If it is the first violation for a student and the faculty member did not recommend that it be forwarded to the Academic Integrity Subcommittee, the Registrar's Office will record the incident in the student's file.
  3. The Registrar will forward the incident to the faculty Academic Integrity Subcommittee if any of the following exists:
  • The student has a prior academic integrity violation
  • The student submits a disagreement letter as to whether a violation occurred and/or disagrees with the consequence(s)
  • The faculty member recommends that the violation be forwarded to the Academic Integrity subcommittee
  1. The Registrar's Office will notify the student either that the violation has been recorded in his or her academic file or that it will be reviewed by the Academic Integrity Subcommittee.

 

STEP 4: Academic Integrity Subcommittee Deliberation

  1. The Academic Integrity Subcommittee will deliberate regarding academic integrity violation cases that have been submitted to the committee for a  decision.  The subcommittee should contain at least one faculty member from the College in which the course was taught.  The Academic Integrity Subcommittee will perform due diligence in reviewing a violation. As part of the review, the committee will review all relevant documentation and may consult with relevant involved parties such as students, faculty, staff, or administrators for information, guidance, and/or clarification. The committee will determine:
  • whether an academic integrity violation occurred
  • what type of academic integrity violation occurred
  1. After determination of a violation, the Academic Integrity Subcommittee will make a determination to support the proposed Course Level consequence(s) or determine different Course Level consequence(s) to ensure consistency across the University and/or impose a University Level consequence(s) for the violation, taking into consideration the decision of the faculty member and the prior history of the student.
  2. The majority decision of the Academic Integrity Subcommittee will be shared with the Registrar's Office.  Within two (2) business days, the Registrar's Office will communicate the decision to the student, the faculty member, and the respective Dean of the course.

 

STEP 5: Appeal Process

  1. A student has the right to appeal the Academic Integrity Subcommittee decision. Within five (5) business days of being notified by the Registrar's Office of the Academic Integrity Subcommittee decision, a student can submit a written appeal to the respective Dean of the course that must address one or both of the following issues for appeal:
  • New evidence that was not reviewed by the Academic Integrity Subcommittee.
  • Any evidence that the review process was improper or unfair.
  1. An appeal letter that does not clearly identify one or both of the issues listed above shall be dismissed without further consideration. The respective Dean of the course will make an initial assessment of a valid appeal after reviewing the incident file provided by the Registrar's Office and, if necessary, by communicating with relevant parties such as staff or administrators.
  • For a valid appeal request, within ten (10) days the respective Dean of the course will schedule a meeting of an Appeal Committee consisting of:
  • Provost (or designee), who will serve as chair
  • Associate Vice President for Adult & Online Operations (only if the course is an online course)
  • Dean (or administrative designee) of each of the Colleges
  • Two full-time faculty members appointed by the Faculty Council who teach outside of the department of the student, have had minimal academic interaction with the student, and who have been at the Doane University at least one year.
  • Registrar (or designee)

The Registrar and respective Dean of the course can be participants in the discussions but will be non-voting members in determining a course of action. All members or their designates must participate for deliberation and decision.

  1. The Appeal Committee will perform due diligence in reviewing an incident. As part of the due diligence, the Committee will review all relevant documentation and may consult with relevant involved parties such as students, faculty, Academic Integrity Subcommittee, staff, or administrators for information, guidance, and/or clarification. The Committee will review the prior decisions for consequence(s) by the faculty member and by the Academic Integrity Subcommittee, as well as review the history in the student's file.
  2. The Appeal Committee will make a determination to support the consequence(s) or determine different Course Level consequence(s)  to ensure consistency across the University or impose a University Level consequence(s) for the violation.
  3. A majority decision by the Appeal Committee is final and ends the appeal process for an academic integrity violation.
  4. Within two (2) business days, the Registrar's office will communicate the majority decision of the Appeal Committee to the student, the faculty member, and the Academic Integrity Subcommittee.

The policy is based off of similar academic integrity policies developed by Nebraska Methodist College and University of Nebraska-Lincoln


Academic Grievance Policy

The grievance process for an academic concern provides an impartial review of an academic conflict or issue to ensure that the rights of a student are properly recognized and protected.  No adverse action will be taken against a student who chooses to utilize this process.

This process is to be used for instances in which a student has an academic concern regarding a decision perceived to be arbitrary, capricious, or applied unequally and impacts the student's academic progression.

Separate policies and processes are in place for the following: Grade Appeal Process, Violence & Unacceptable Behavior Policy, Sexual Assault and Rape Policy, Bias/Hate Incident Policy, Anti-Harassment Policy, and ADA Grievance Procedure.

Valid reasons for initiating the grievance process include, but are not limited to,

  • a failure to follow published course, program, or University policies,
  • a lack of consistency within the student's course section, or
  • the decision was motivated by ill will.

The following are NOT valid reasons for initiating the grievance process: (i) a disagreement with the application of course policies and/or grading standards, (ii) the requirements or examination standards of an academic program, (iii) issues regarding program accreditation requirements, (iv) concerns over professionally acceptable teaching approaches, (v) differing personalities, and (vi) differences in classroom policies or grading schemes in different courses or between different sections of the same course.  The grievance process should not be initiated simply due to its impact on a student's academic progress and standing, ability to receive or maintain a scholarship or monetary award, ability to maintain recognition of distinction, or eligibility for a club or organization.

The academic grievance process for an academic concern must be initiated no later than one (1) month from the occurrence of the concern.  A student is encouraged to talk with their advisor, the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs (Crete-campus), or Campus Director (Lincoln, Grand Island, Omaha campus locations) to offer an assessment of the concern and to clarify the steps of the grievance process.

Grievance Steps

STEP 1:  A student is encouraged to pursue a good-faith attempt at informally resolving the academic concern.  The student will communicate the concern with the involved individual (e.g., faculty member, program director, or Dean) to find a solution.  If needed, the student can contact the Office of Academic Affairs (Crete-campus) or the Campus director (Lincoln, Grand Island, Omaha campus locations) for assistance in contacting the individual.  A student may be requested to put their concern and request in writing. Within five (5) working days from the time the student raises the concern, the involved individual will evaluate the concern, render a decision or response, and notify the student.  As part of his/her evaluation, the involved individual may schedule a follow-up conversation with the student and may consult University faculty, staff, or administrators for clarification and/or guidance. If the involved individual does not act on or resolve the concern to the reasonable satisfaction of the student, the student can initiate STEP 2 of the grievance process.  

STEP 2:  Within five (5) working days of the student being notified by the involved individual of his/her decision or response, the student writes a notification letter specifying

  • a statement of facts as the student perceives them, citing specific instances where, in the student's opinion, policies and procedures were violated or were unfairly applied,
  • a summary of the outcome from STEP 1,
  • the remedy sought by the student, and
  • the best method to communicate with the student (phone, e-mail, etc.).

The student is encouraged to seek guidance from an Appeal Advisor in regards to their concern and development of this letter.  The Office of Academic Affairs can provide the name of an Appeal Advisor.

The student provides their notification letter to the supervisor of the involved individual (e.g., an issue regarding a faculty member would go to the respective department chair, program director, or dean).  The Appeal Advisor or the Office of Academic Affairs can offer clarification on the appropriate supervisor. Within ten (10) working days from receipt of the letter, the supervisor will evaluate the concern, render a decision or response, and notify the student.  As part of his/her evaluation, the supervisor may schedule a conversation with the student and may consult University faculty, staff, or administrators for clarification and/or guidance. If the supervisor does not act on or resolve the concern to the reasonable satisfaction of the student, within ten (10) days of being notified of the decision, the student can initiate STEP 3 of the grievance process.  

STEP 3:  The student provides their notification letter to the appropriate Dean.  A student can contact an Appeal Advisor or the Office of Academic Affairs for clarification on the appropriate Dean for the issue.  If the Dean was the supervisor in STEP 2, the student can initiate STEP 4. Within ten (10) working days of receipt of the letter, the Dean will evaluate the concern, render a decision or response, and notify the student.  As part of his/her evaluation, the Dean may schedule a conversation with the student and may consult University faculty, staff, or administrators for clarification and/or guidance. If the Academic Dean does not act on or resolve the concern to reasonable satisfaction of the student, within ten (10) days of being notified of the decision, the student can initiate STEP 4 of the grievance process.  

STEP 4:  The student can submit a written appeal to the Office of Academic Affairs.  In the appeal, the student provides their prior notification letter and also addresses one or both of the following issues for appeal:

  • new evidence that was not reviewed in prior steps and/or
  • any evidence that the review process was improper or unfair.

An appeal that does not clearly identify one or both of the issues listed above shall be dismissed without further consideration. The Vice President for Academic Affairs will make an initial assessment of an appeal after reviewing the incident file and, if necessary, by communicating with relevant parties such as staff or administrators. For a valid appeal request, the Office of Academic Affairs will convene an Appeal Committee consisting of

  • Vice President for Academic Affairs (or designee), will serve as Chair,
  • Associate Vice President for Adult and Online Operations (if the course is an online course),
  • Dean (or administrative designee) of each of the colleges, and
  • two full-time faculty members appointed by the Faculty Council who teach outside of the department of the student, have had minimal academic interaction with the student, and who have been at the Doane University at least one year.

The Dean from STEP 3 can participate in the discussions but will be a non-voting member in determining a course of action.  As part of the evaluation, the committee may schedule a conversation with the student and may consult other University faculty, staff, or administrators for guidance and/or clarification.  A majority decision by the ad-hoc committee is final and ends the appeal process for an academic grievance.  Once a decision is rendered, the student will be notified.


Graduation

Graduation Application

All Doane University students are required to complete and submit an Application for Graduation available on WebAdvisor. The process occurs once a student is nearing his/her final course work.

Honors at Graduation

Degrees with honors are conferred upon those students who graduate with a 3.94 GPA or higher and have completed at least 48 graded credits at Doane University. The College of Professional Studies and the College of Arts and Sciences are considered separately for determination of degrees with honors.

Summa Cum Laude 4.00
Magna Cum Laude 3.98 - 3.99
Cum Laude 3.94 - 3.97

Award of Degree/Issuance of Diplomas

Degrees at Doane University are awarded and diplomas are issued three times a year: at the end of the Winter I Term in December, at the end of the Spring term in May, and on August 15. Graduation ceremonies takes place in December and May.

Students who complete graduation requirements at the completion of the Autumn (October) or Winter II (March) term will have a comment stating that requirements for the degree have been met and that the degree will be awarded at the next ceremony.  Students who complete graduation requirements after May Commencement but no later than August 15 of the same year, are awarded their degree as of August 15. (All final grades and any official transcripts from other schools must be received by the Registrar by August 15.) Diplomas will be mailed to each August graduate.

Diplomas only list the degree awarded (Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science), not the majors earned. Students who double major do not receive two diplomas. Student who return to Doane to complete an additional major do not receive a second diploma.

Participation in Commencement

Commencement is held twice a year at the end of the Winter I and Spring term. A student who has not completed degree requirements by the end of the Winter I or Spring term may participate in the ceremony if he/she is lacking one requirement and receives permission from the College of Professional Studies Dean to participate.

Second Degree Policy

It is possible for a student to satisfy the requirements for more than one major program; the University will not grant two degrees for programs taken concurrently. The student must declare which degree will be posted on the transcript and diploma. A graduate who returns and completes a minimum of 30 credits beyond whatever number was accumulated for the first baccalaureate may qualify for a different Doane degree. (One cannot earn two B.A. degrees, for example.)

Transcripts

The Registrar's Office releases official Doane transcripts of a student's academic record only after the student has granted permission in writing. Transcripts are not issued to students who have financial obligations to the university. Students who request transcripts should allow three days for them to be prepared and issued. A fee is assessed for each transcript.

During periods at the beginning or following the end of a term, at least one week should be allowed for issuance. Official transcripts from other institutions which may be part of a Doane student's file cannot be copied and issued to the student. To obtain copies, the student must contact the original issuing institution directly.

Once a student graduates or discontinues attendance at Doane University, subsequent college credits from other schools do not become a part of the student's Doane University transcript.

Doane University partners with National Student Clearinghouse (NSC) for degree verification, enrollment verification, and electronic transcripts.  Doane University submits enrollment information to NSC three times a term.  In turn, NSC reports secure electronic data with participating guaranty agencies, lenders, and servicers for loan deferment.  NSC also submits enrollment information to the National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS), the national database of information about loans and grants awarded to students under Title IV. 

Address and Name changes

Each Doane student is responsible for notifying the University of any address or name change.  Address changes are to be made promptly to keep University records current and to insure that University mailings reach their intended recipient.  Students who have been enrolled within the last year need to submit documentation for a name change.  Documentation can be a social security card, divorce decree, marriage license, or court order.  A student may change their name or address on the Doane website